The Age Of Walmart (2004)

In this Peabody Award-winning program, CNBC’s David Faber scrutinizes Wal-Mart as he seeks to understand how the company has ascended to the heights of power it has come to occupy-and whether this juggernaut can continue to succeed in the face of increased opposition. Given unprecedented access, Faber takes viewers from an annual managers’ meeting that resembles an evangelical revival to the opening of a new store in China, where Wal-Mart is one of the country’s leading importers. Faber also sits down for a one-on-one with CEO Lee Scott, who addresses criticisms over outsourcing, community friction, lawsuits, and other issues.

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PBS: Is Wal-Mart Good For America (2004)

To understand the secret of Wal-Mart’s success, Smith travels from the company’s headquarters in Bentonville, Ark., to their global procurement center in Shenzhen, China, where several hundred employees work to keep the company’s import pipeline running smoothly. Of Wal-Mart’s 6,000 global suppliers, experts estimate that as many as 80 percent are based in China.

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Marketing Madness: Are We All Insane? (2010)

The definitive documentary on psychotropic drugging-this is the story of the high-income partnership between drug companies and psychiatry which has created an $80 billion profit from the peddling of psychotropic drugs to an unsuspecting public. The documentary exposes the truth behind the slick marketing schemes and scientific deceit that conceal a dangerous and often deadly sales campaign.

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The Corporation (2003)

This documentary begins with an unusual detail that came from the 14th Amendment: Under constitutional law, corporations are seen as individuals. So, filmmaker Mark Achbar asks, what type of person would a corporation be? The evidence, according to such political activists as Noam Chomsky and filmmaker Michael Moore and company heads like carpet magnate Ray Anderson, points to a bad one, as the film aims to expose IBM’s Nazi ties and these large businesses’ exploitation of human rights.

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The Revolution Will Not Be Televised (2003)

In April 2002, the democratically elected Venezuelan president, Hugo Chavez, faces a coup d’état by an American-backed opposition party. The two-day coup fails to topple Chávez, but the tumultuous event proves to be great dramatic material for two Irish filmmakers who happen to be making a documentary about Chavez as the coup erupts. They capture footage of the massive opposition and pro-Chavez crowds and analyze how Venezuelan TV manipulated images for propaganda purposes.

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