The Age Of Walmart (2004)

In this Peabody Award-winning program, CNBC’s David Faber scrutinizes Wal-Mart as he seeks to understand how the company has ascended to the heights of power it has come to occupy-and whether this juggernaut can continue to succeed in the face of increased opposition. Given unprecedented access, Faber takes viewers from an annual managers’ meeting that resembles an evangelical revival to the opening of a new store in China, where Wal-Mart is one of the country’s leading importers. Faber also sits down for a one-on-one with CEO Lee Scott, who addresses criticisms over outsourcing, community friction, lawsuits, and other issues.

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PBS: Is Wal-Mart Good For America (2004)

To understand the secret of Wal-Mart’s success, Smith travels from the company’s headquarters in Bentonville, Ark., to their global procurement center in Shenzhen, China, where several hundred employees work to keep the company’s import pipeline running smoothly. Of Wal-Mart’s 6,000 global suppliers, experts estimate that as many as 80 percent are based in China.

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The Corporation (2003)

This documentary begins with an unusual detail that came from the 14th Amendment: Under constitutional law, corporations are seen as individuals. So, filmmaker Mark Achbar asks, what type of person would a corporation be? The evidence, according to such political activists as Noam Chomsky and filmmaker Michael Moore and company heads like carpet magnate Ray Anderson, points to a bad one, as the film aims to expose IBM’s Nazi ties and these large businesses’ exploitation of human rights.

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Iraq For Sale (2006)

After purchasing influence in the halls of Congress, private interests such as Halliburton have been awarded lucrative no-bid contracts. Meanwhile, on the ground, these corporations employ questionable practices that endanger the lives of both American soldiers and Iraqis. The film asks the question, when war becomes a business, what incentive is there to end it?

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TLC Phenomenon: Monopoly Men (1998)

During the Wilson Presidency, the U.S. Government sanctioned the creation of the Federal Reserve. Thought by many to be a government organization maintained to provide financial accountability in the event of a domestic depression, the actual business of the FED is shrouded in secrecy. People of the world will be shocked to discover that the principal business of the FED is to print money from nothing, lend it to the U.S. Government and charge interest on these loans. Who keeps the interest? Good question. Find out as the connective tissue between this and other top secret international organizations is explored.

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